NIOT Princeton

Free Your Mind: Recognizing Urban Trauma. 3rd Annual Urban Mental Health Alliance Conference, Saturday, October 21

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Author Talk: Sharon Draper, October 24, 2017

copper-sun-212x300As part of the Princeton & Slavery Project, Sharon Draper,  acclaimed author and educator, visits the library to talk about her historical novel for young adults, “Copper Sun.” The book tells the story of 15-year-old Amari whose happy life in Ghana is destroyed when she is captured and sold into a life of slavery in America. Princeton Public Library, Community Room, Tuesday, October 24, 6:00-8:00 pm.

WHY AND HOW TO ENCOURAGE CROSS-RACIAL FRIENDSHIPS IN YOUNG CHILDREN

An EmbraceRace Community Conversation and Q&A with Professor Amber Williams

REGISTER TO JOIN this free, online, community conversation happening this coming Tuesday, October 24th, at 5:30 pm PT/ 8:30 pm ET

Help us spread the word! Do you have friends and family whom you think would be interested in this conversation? Invite them to participate with you!

Why We Gather. Especially in these racially turbulent times, many parents, guardians and teachers want to promote cross-racial friendships among the children they care about and for. And why not? Research shows that cross-racial friendships reduce racial bias and feelings of vulnerability in school among children. We also know that such friendships are relatively rare among older children, with some children coming to expect that Black and White children will only have same-race friends. What distinguishes the children who have positive attitudes about, and friendships with, different-race kids from the children who don’t? Join us to talk about cross-racial friendships among children – and what parents and other caregivers might do to encourage them in young children.

We look forward to seeing you online on October 24th at 5:30 pm PT/8:30 pm ET. Registering also ensures that you will receive the after-event recording and resources whether you attend live or not.

Agenda

8:30 to 8:35 pm ET: Andrew and Melissa of EmbraceRace introduce the conversation and our guest
8:35 to 8:55 pm ET: Professor Amber Williams shares what she’s learned from her work on cross-racial friendships in young children.
8:55 to 9:25 pm ET: Questions and comments from the EmbraceRace community.
9:25 to 9:30 pm ET: Closing thoughts

Amber Williams is an Assistant Professor of Psychology at California Polytechnic State University in San Luis Obispo. Her broad research interests focus on the role of race in shaping youths’ self-concepts, their relationships with in- and out-group members, and their academic outcomes. Amber received her Ph.D. in Psychology from the U

Poetry Class on Gwendolyn Brooks, November-December, 2017

Great poet.  Great teacher.  Not to be missed.

 

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There really is no place “safe,” is there?

The other day, I touched on the fact that I’ve faced some stark realizations over the past few years, even though I previously thought I was pretty “enlightened.” The realization I came to after this particular event hit me really deep (and still does)…

I belong to a forum for old Dodge trucks and there’s a young African American kid on there that is just a riot. I think he’s 19 or 20. This kid is smart, funny, and his enthusiasm is just infectious. I’ve really enjoyed following his adventures (and sometimes misadventures) as he works his way through saving a 30+ year old truck that was an electrical nightmare even when it was new. 

One day, another guy on the forum posted about his girlfriend having been in a hit and run accident and (in his words) “if they catch the little gold-toothed, brillo-haired, SOB I’m sure he won’t have insurance and the car was probably stolen.” At first, it made me angry. I called the guy on it and reported the post to the site’s admins. The offending post was removed right away but the damage had surely already been done. When I realized my young friend had to have seen it I became not only angry, but sad as well; and I became completely horrified when it hit me…

There really is no place “safe,” is there? Ever. It’s always there, just waiting to rear its ugly head for no apparent reason, at any given time or place; even in something as seemingly innocent as an automotive hobby. I mean it’s not like racism itself is new to me, I’ve seen it my whole life and if we’re being completely honest, I’m sure I practiced it at times as a younger man or at least stood by and said nothing when I saw it. Now that I’m older, and hopefully wiser, the realization that it is literally EVERYWHERE and at ALL times, hit me like a brick to the head. Me, the guy that thought I knew something.

It has bothered me at times that many people of color seem to distrust white people automatically and as a whole. Many of those times, I’ve wanted to say “hey, we’re not all like that, why must you distrust all of us?” Well, now I know why; and it’s a terrible thing to know. I’m pretty sure if I was unaware how it exists always and everywhere most, if not all, other white people are also unaware of its true extent.

All I can say is, some of us really are trying and want things to be better… but we clearly have a long, long way to go. I hope that makes some kind of sense.

There really is no place “safe,” is there? Ever. It’s always there, just waiting to rear its ugly head for no apparent reason, at any given time or place; even in something as seemingly innocent as an automotive hobby. I mean it’s not like racism itself is new to me, I’ve seen it my whole life and if we’re being completely honest, I’m sure I practiced it at times as a younger man or at least stood by and said nothing when I saw it. Now that I’m older, and hopefully wiser, the realization that it is literally EVERYWHERE and at ALL times, hit me like a brick to the head. Me, the guy that

Dan Moore

IDENTITY DEVELOPMENT: JOURNEY OF BLACK LIVES IN AMERICAN SOCIETY

LECTURES & DISCUSSIONS ON THE TOPIC OF ADOLESCENT YOUTH AS THEY DEVELOP INTO EMERGING ADULTHOOD

LECTURE I: BOYS TO MEN

Lecture I by: Don Trahan, PhD, LPC, NCC, ACS: Counselor Educator & Supervisor, Leader, and Multicultural, Diversity & Inclusion Expert Consultant

October 28, 2017, 11:00am – 2:00pm, First Baptist Church of Lincoln Gardens Somerset, St. Somerset, NJ 08873

Understanding the experiences of Black boys as they develop in their thinking and knowing who they are: Risk factors and barriers.  Address the question: What ethnically differentiates Black identity development in American society?  Open discussion on the cultural rituals that signify Black boys making the transition into adulthood: Protective factors

LECTURE II: GIRLS TO WOMEN

Lecture II by: Sherritta Hughes, PhD, LPC, ACS: Counselor Educator & Supervisor, Assistant Professor, Past-President of Maryland Association for Multicultural Counseling & Development, Diversity Coordinator Therapist at The College of NJ.

Date in November TBD

LECTURE III: SETTING THE STAGE FOR HEALTHY RELATIONSHIPS BETWEEN BOYS & GIRLS/MEN & WOMEN

• WHO SHOULD ATTEND?  COMMUNITY LEADERS, COUNSELORS, TEACHERS, PARENTS & CAREGIVERS OF ADOLESCENTS & YOUNG ADULTS PROFESSIONAL MENTAL HEALTH WORKS COMMUNITY

*PRE-RESISTRATION IS MANDATORY DUE TO LIMITED SEATING.  COST is Free,
but all attendees MUST REGISTER due to limited seats

Email for online registration link: sherrittahughes1@yahoo.com

 

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