Racial Literacy

2016 Racial Literacy Series in Princeton

Our 2016 Racial Literacy series has now concluded, but we have archived much of the recorded content here to enable folks to continue to engage with these issues and questions. If this series opened your eyes and fired you up, please don’t stop now! Follow our blog (add your email address to the “Follow This Blog” widget at the top of the right-hand sidebar), dig into our list of resources, attend our monthly Continuing Conversations on Race & White Privilege at the Princeton Public Library, make a donation, and/or look for our Calls To Action. The work continues…

If you want to use these videos in your community, please include the following statement in your publicity: “The Racial Literacy series was presented in 2016  with support from the National Endowment for the Humanities through the Princeton Public Library, co-sponsored by Not in Our Town (Princeton) and the Princeton Garden Theatre.  Any views, findings, conclusions or recommendations expressed in this programming do not necessarily represent those of the National Endowment for the Humanities or the library.” Not in Our Town would be pleased to know where programs are taking place; send a message describing your experience to info@niotprinceton.org.

Ruha Benjamin: “Race Unplugged: Moving Beyond Sound Bites of Pundits, Politicians, and Pop Culture from Princeton Public Library on Vimeo.

(This recording of Professor Benjamin’s initial public lecture on Oct. 18th was made possible by a grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities.)

(Professor Benjamin’s second public talk also took place at the Princeton Public Library.)

Racial literacy is among the 21st century skills that all students and citizens need to live and work successfully in our rapidly diversifying society. During a 5-week program this fall (starting on Tuesday, October 18th), parents, educators, and students of all ages had the opportunity to learn about and contribute to a racial literacy “toolbox.” (We have subsequently added a final “Create An Action Plan” session on Tuesday, Nov. 29th, at 6:30pm at the Princeton Public Library.)

The free series included talks and discussions by Ruha Benjamin, Assistant Professor of African American Studies, Princeton University, and a screening of the video Race: The Power of an Illusion. This timely program was sponsored by Not in Our Town, the Princeton Public Library, and the Princeton Garden Theatre

Ruha Benjamin Public Lectures

An assistant professor in the department of African American Studies at Princeton University, Ruha Benjamin specializes in the interdisciplinary study of science, medicine, & technology; race-ethnicity and gender; biopolitics; and the sociology of knowledge. She is the author of “People’s Science: Bodies and Rights on the Stem Cell Frontier,” which examines the tension between innovation and equity in the context of state investment in stem cell research and against the backdrop of medical experimentation on subordinate social groups.

(Both lectures were in the Princeton Public Library’s Community Room)

 

Films and Discussions

“Race: The Power of an Illusion”

We screened this award-winning three part series examining race in society, science and history; each screening was followed by a facilitated audience discussion. We encourage you to watch the three episodes, which are available on YouTube and which are embedded below for your convenience.

Episode 1: “The Differences Between Us”

 

Episode 2: “The Story We Tell”

 

Episode 3: “The House We Live In”

 

(All three screenings were at the Princeton Garden Theatre.)

The “Bonus” Series Finale was held on Tuesday, Nov. 29, 6:30pm, at the Princeton Public Library.

If this series opened your eyes and fired you up, please follow our blog (add your email address to the “Follow This Blog” widget at the top of the right-hand sidebar), dig into our resource list, attend our Continuing Conversations on Race & White Privilege, and look for our Calls To Action.

Our 2016 Racial Literacy series was presented with support from the National Endowment for the Humanities through the Princeton Public Library. Any views, findings, conclusions or recommendations expressed in this programming do not necessarily represent those of the National Endowment for the Humanities.

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